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on the books, now laws in our country. i think that's what we are going to have to do. we are going to have to find people, across the aisle, who we can work w. in order to pass legislation in this area of gun violence that will make a difference in the lives of millions of americans. >> mr. lynch. >> sure. i want to point out that we serve in the legislature with 435 members. you can't break for lunch without getting 218 votes. so whenever you hear a legislator saying i solve the cargo security issue, i'm responsible for port security even though i voted against t. i'm the one who is responsible for nuclear safety, i'm the one who did the assault weapons ban, look, the truth of the matter is ed has been on the side of big business. on ast at that -- 1/2 25 -- nafta on fishing rights, i'm with the fishermen, you're with the fish. on the banking issues, i'm with the taxpayers, and the people of america, you're with the big banks and the bailout. on all these issues on the telecommunications, you're with the telecommunications companies. >> that's quite a laundry list. let him respond. >> tha
quickly walk away from it, what is not normal. that we only have so many law enforcement people. we have a guy in times where the waterway and there may be a normal explanation for it. i get on the metra system and by putting my earphones and a listen to my music or whatever when that is probably not a very smart thing, particularly for a guy like me to do. but it is just being aware -- you know, it is so easy. when i went to vietnam ever went said, stay alert, stay alive. i think people will be a little bit more alert right now, but just look for things that are out of place. is an author.t is ned zsa,ler republican. 'd think throrism comes at all different forms and different faces, not just literally, but metaphorically, too. you cannot say that it is not political or that it is. it is hard to label active terrorism -- acts of terrorism sometimes providing it is up to with identifying terrorism. we sometimes let our guard down and i feel like we do not know when the time is to act. when something should be under suspicion. we wait for something to happen. tough one. is a you are
locomotives. about half a billion dollars to be spent on these new locomotives. in that section of law, one sentence was added that said these must be 100% american made. no one was making locomotives in america before that. but siemens, the german corporation, one of the biggest manufacturers in the world said, oh, half a billion dollar well, can make locomotives in america, sure. in sacramento, california, they opened a manufacturing plant, probably somewhere between 200 and 300 people working there today manufacturing 100% american made locomotives and on may 134, three years after they began this process, the first 100% american made locomotive in probably more than a century rolled onto the tracks of america. we can do this. h.r. 549 will provide that opportunity, using american-taxpayer money. i have another bill that does the same for wind and solar projects. we can do these things and put our mind to it and get past this business of austerity. we cannot solve this problem of american jobs with an austerity budget. we see it failing here in europe and united states as the long-term u
it into law. that undertaking and many others, john berry made a real difference of the more than 62,000 federal workers and everyone else who called my district home. just as we look to our federal workers to watch out for us, our federal workers look to john to watch out for them, to make sure they have a safe work environment, that their paychecks will arrive on time and the benefits they earn are the ones they receive. under president clinton, john served as deputy assistant secretary and acting assistant secretary for law enforcement at the treasury department. overseeing the united states secret service and the bureau of alcohol, tobacco and firearms. and he later moved to the interior department where he was assistant secretary for policy, management and budget, essentially the manager of the department of interior. before coming to the office of personnel management, john spent nearly a decade working on conservation as director of the fish and wildlife foundation, and then arguably the job he perhaps has enjoyed most, he became director of the national zoo. at the national z
the nation's immigration laws gathered at capitol hill yesterday to put pressure on lawmakers. >> make sure that they hear from you. that they know without a doubt in their mind that keeping their jobs depends on them supporting comprehensive immigration reform. >> what we're seeing right now is an incredible amount of support, both from the left and from the right. >> the new proposal also puts millions of illegal immigrants on a path to citizenship. but only if they arrived in the u.s. before the end of 2011. those who have been charged with crimes, would not be eligible. >>> president obama will host south korea's newly elected first female president at the white house next month. they will observe the 60th anniversary of the alliance between the u.s. and south korea. also high on their agenda, efforts to counter the nuclear threat posed by north korea. >>> in venezuela, demand for a recount in the presidential election. ballots were ignored leading to an anti-government protest. the election results were certified. the winner by a razor thin margin less than one percentage point hand-pi
by will you -- must include the contributions of the transgendered? by law. you will have to have pages on transgendered contributions. people who were crossed over sex, or dressed in the other sex. clothing. isn't that absurd? isn't that totalitarian? i thought the purpose of the textbook was to tell the truth, not make groups feel good. but as i point out in the book, leftism is overwhelmingly rooted in feelings. >> host: dennis prager is the author. "still the best hope" is the name of his recent best seller. louis from florida, you're on the air. you're talking with dennis prager. >> caller: i'd like to ask mr. prayinger and his ilk what he just said about truth, why should people believe the bible when that's the biggest novel ever written? who believes the earth is 5,000 years old? how can you follow a book that tells you the world is 5,000 years old and hisclass commentary about the christian schools and the seminary, how does he say something like that and he wants to be honest? i know this man is a right winger, and he wouldn't fifth credit to anybody, but my main question is,
human rationality. people do all kinds of really stupid things. we enact stupid laws sometimes that a lot of people agree on more because certain interest groups influence others. look at the gun legislation. yeah it's for the failure to enact it is driven by the economic interest of a certain small bunch of businesses but is that really why a huge number of other individuals who believe that's a good thing to do or wildly misinterpret the second amendment because they feel it within themselves. with regard to slavery and you jumped off from that, one of the things that became and has become clear to me the more i have delved into the world of the slave owner it's self and indeed the pre-emancipation north where it wasn't really all that different, is that a lot of people really liked slavery. they liked it. yes it was profitable but it wasn't always all that profitable and a motivator particularly in the 19th century was much of the south it was up into the respectable middle class to own a slave. it gave you a status in the stature that you might not have otherwise so why did
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7